‘Low Food’ diet craze sweeping the nation


The Cabbage Soup Diet is an example of a rather arduous modern diet that can be made to look much more appealing by the inclusion of an attractive naked woman. (Image: TipTimes, CC-BY-SA 2.0)

Madonna is allegedly doing it.

Carrie Fisher is probably doing it, too. Disney insists.

So should you hop on the latest diet craze?

The ‘Low Food’ diet, also known as the ‘Stop Eating As Much As You Want and Only As Much As You Need’ diet, is based on the idea that weight gain is the body’s physiological response to consuming excess calories.

So is it legit? Here’s what top nutritionists had to say about the ‘Low Food’ diet’s effectiveness.

“It lacks the ‘cleverness factor’ of other recent diets. If something sounds too simple to be true, it probably is,” claims Francis Chaudhry, a registered dietitian and special advisor to the fast food industry. “I know that I personally considered the idea of eating less to lose weight but dismissed it as ridiculously naïve.”

Stephen Bravo, a Brampton-based nutrition consultant and author of ‘The Paleo-Werewolf Cleanse and Other Hybrid Interventions’ was similarly dismissive. “Here’s some food for thought: the hallmark of a popular diet is the extreme restriction or complete elimination of a very specific food or nutrient, or the exclusive consumption of a food item or class with the exclusion of everything else. This has neither.”

The experts agree. Don’t eat less of your current diet. Don’t contemplate a simple reversal of the eating patterns that led to your weight gain. For best results, do something completely foreign and disruptive and try to sustain it for the rest of your life.

Sebastian Panache

Sebastian Panache

Editor-in-Chief. Follow him on Twitter @SebPanache. Or don’t. It’s okay, really.

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